PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY

HOW WERE THE MAJOR MOUNTAIN BELTS OF THE WORLD PRODUCED

  • A. By wind erosion
  • B. By Folding ✓
  • C. By glacial erosion
  • D. By weathering
  • E. By river deposition

 

The major mountain belts of the world were primarily produced by folding, a geological process that involves the bending and deformation of rock layers due to tectonic forces. This process is a result of the immense pressure and stress exerted on the Earth’s crust, leading to the formation of large-scale structures such as mountain ranges. Wind erosion, glacial erosion, weathering, and river deposition can contribute to the shaping and modification of mountain landscapes, but they are not the primary mechanisms responsible for the creation of major mountain belts.

Folding is a fundamental process in the formation of mountain ranges, where compressional forces cause rocks to bend and fold, resulting in uplifted and folded structures. Over millions of years, these folded rocks can be further shaped by erosion processes such as wind, glaciers, weathering, and rivers. However, it is the initial tectonic forces that drive the formation of mountain belts through folding.

In summary, while wind erosion, glacial erosion, weathering, and river deposition play important roles in shaping mountain landscapes, it is the process of folding driven by tectonic forces that is primarily responsible for the creation of major mountain belts around the world.

In other words, Mountain belts around the world have been primarily produced by the geological process of folding. This process involves the bending and buckling of rock layers due to tectonic forces acting on the Earth’s crust. The formation of mountain ranges through folding typically occurs at convergent plate boundaries, where two tectonic plates collide.

When two plates converge, one plate is often forced beneath the other in a process known as subduction. The immense pressure and heat generated during this collision cause the rocks to deform and fold, leading to the uplift of large landmasses and the creation of mountain ranges. Over millions of years, these folded rocks are further shaped by erosion processes, such as wind, water, and glaciers, which carve out valleys and peaks, giving mountains their distinctive shapes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *