CHEMISTRY

THE ENERGY CHANGE THAT ACCOMPANIES THE ADDITION OF AN ELECTRON TO AN ISOLATED GASEOUS ATOM IS

  • A. bond energy
  • B. electronegativity
  • C. electron affinity ✓
  • D. ionization energy

 

When an electron is added to an isolated gaseous atom, the energy change that occurs is known as the electron affinity. Electron affinity is defined as the energy released or absorbed when an electron is added to a neutral atom in the gaseous phase to form a negative ion. It is a measure of how much an atom “wants” to gain an electron.

Electron affinity can be either positive or negative. A positive electron affinity indicates that energy is released when an electron is added, meaning the atom has a tendency to accept electrons. On the other hand, a negative electron affinity indicates that energy must be supplied to add an electron, suggesting that the atom does not readily accept additional electrons.

In the context of the given options:

  • Bond energy refers to the energy required to break a chemical bond, not related to adding an electron to an atom.
  • Electronegativity is a measure of an atom’s ability to attract shared electrons in a chemical bond but does not directly relate to adding an electron to form an ion.
  • Ionization energy is the energy required to remove an electron from a gaseous atom, which is opposite in nature to electron affinity.

Therefore, the correct answer in this case is electron affinity, as it specifically describes the energy change associated with adding an electron to an isolated gaseous atom.

In other words, the energy change that accompanies the addition of an electron to an isolated gaseous atom is known as electron affinity. Electron affinity is defined as the energy released or absorbed when an electron is added to a neutral atom in the gaseous phase to form a negative ion. It is a measure of how strongly an atom attracts additional electrons.

Electron affinity is a crucial concept in chemistry as it helps in understanding the reactivity and chemical behavior of elements. Elements with high electron affinities tend to readily accept electrons, while those with low electron affinities are less likely to gain additional electrons.

When an electron is added to an isolated gaseous atom, the process can either release energy (exothermic) or absorb energy (endothermic), depending on the element and its electronic configuration. The magnitude of the electron affinity provides information about the stability of the resulting negative ion.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *