GENERAL KNOWLEDGE

UNDERSTANDING DIABETES AT THE PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL LEVEL

Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by high blood sugar levels, which can lead to a variety of complications if left untreated. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system attacks and destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. As a result, people with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce enough insulin and must rely on insulin injections or an insulin pump to control their blood sugar levels.

Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is caused by a combination of insulin resistance (when the body’s cells become less responsive to insulin) and impaired insulin secretion. Insulin resistance can be caused by a variety of factors, including obesity, physical inactivity, and genetics. As a result, the body produces more insulin to try to keep blood sugar levels under control, but eventually, the pancreas cannot keep up with the demand, and blood sugar levels rise.

The pathophysiology of diabetes is complex and involves many different physiological processes. Here are some of the key changes that occur in the body:

  1. High blood sugar levels: The hallmark of diabetes is high blood sugar levels. When the body cannot produce enough insulin or the cells become less responsive to insulin, blood sugar levels rise.
  2. Insulin resistance: As mentioned earlier, insulin resistance is a key factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. When the body’s cells become less responsive to insulin, the pancreas must produce more insulin to keep blood sugar levels under control.
  3. Inflammation: Diabetes is a pro-inflammatory state, and chronic inflammation can contribute to the development of complications such as cardiovascular disease and nerve damage.
  4. Oxidative stress: High blood sugar levels can lead to the formation of free radicals, which can damage cells and contribute to the development of complications.
  5. Glycation: High blood sugar levels can also lead to the formation of advanced glycosylation end-products (AGEs), which can accumulate in tissues and contribute to the development of complications such as kidney damage and nerve damage.
  6. Nephropathy: Diabetes can damage the kidneys and lead to nephropathy, which can cause a variety of symptoms including proteinuria (excess protein in the urine), hematuria (blood in the urine), and decreased kidney function.
  7. Neuropathy: High blood sugar levels can damage the nerves, leading to neuropathy, which can cause a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling, and pain in the hands and feet.
  8. Retinopathy: Diabetes can also damage the blood vessels in the eyes, leading to retinopathy, which can cause vision loss and blindness.

In conclusion, the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus is a complex process involving high blood sugar levels, insulin resistance, inflammation, oxidative stress, glycation, nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. It is important to manage diabetes carefully to prevent or delay the development of these complications.

My moral story. The residences at coconut point.