GENERAL KNOWLEDGE

DISTINGUISH BETWEEN SUBSTITUTE GOODS AND COMPLEMENTARY GOODS

Substitute goods and complementary goods are two concepts used in economics to describe the relationship between different products in the market.

1) Substitute Goods

Substitute goods are products or services that can be used in place of one another to fulfill a similar need or want. These goods are often similar in terms of their purpose, quality, and price. When the price of one good increases or decreases, the demand for the other good tends to increase or decrease accordingly. This is due to the fact that consumers will switch to the other good as a cheaper alternative if the price of the first good becomes too high.

For example, consider two brands of orange juice: Brand A and Brand B. If the price of Brand A increases, consumers may switch to Brand B as it serves the same purpose and satisfies the same need for a glass of orange juice. Both brands are considered substitute goods because they can be used interchangeably to fulfill the desire for a refreshing orange juice beverage.

 

2) Complementary Goods

Complementary goods, on the other hand, are products or services that are typically purchased together to enhance the consumption or use of another good or service. These goods are often complementary in nature, as their demand tends to increase when the demand for the primary good or service also increases. In other words, the value of these goods is derived from their use in conjunction with another good or service.

For example, consider a computer and a printer. A computer is the primary good, while the printer is a complementary good. The demand for a printer increases when the demand for a computer increases, as consumers need a printer to print documents, photos, or other files from their computer. Similarly, the demand for ink cartridges is complementary to the demand for printers, as ink is necessary to make the printer functional.

In conclusion, substitute goods are products or services that can be used interchangeably to fulfill a similar need or want, while complementary goods are products or services that are typically purchased together to enhance the consumption or use of another good or service. The distinction between these two types of goods is essential for understanding consumer behavior and market dynamics.

Cultivating opportunities : community development grants for agriculture and aquaculture in kenya.