GENERAL KNOWLEDGE

A TRAGIC HERO, ACCORDING TO THE ARISTOTELIAN PRECEPT, MUST BE A

  • A. central character after whom the play is named
  • B. king with deep affection for his subjects
  • C. noble character with hubris ✓
  • D. lowly character who suddenly stumbles on some fortunes

 

The answer to the question is: C. noble character with hubris

A tragic hero, according to the Aristotelian precept, must be a noble character with hubris. This concept is outlined in Aristotle’s “Poetics,” where he defines a tragic hero as a person of noble stature and outstanding qualities who possesses a fatal flaw, or hamartia, which leads to their downfall. The tragic hero’s downfall evokes feelings of pity and fear in the audience, leading to catharsis.

The tragic hero typically experiences a reversal of fortune due to their hubris, or excessive pride. This hubris often blinds the hero to their own limitations and leads them to make decisions that ultimately result in their undoing. Despite their noble qualities, the tragic hero’s downfall is inevitable, highlighting the idea that even the most virtuous individuals are subject to fate and the consequences of their actions.

In Greek tragedy, the tragic hero is a central figure around whom the plot revolves. Their actions and decisions drive the narrative forward and ultimately lead to their tragic fate. Through the portrayal of the tragic hero, audiences are able to reflect on universal themes such as the nature of power, the consequences of pride, and the fragility of human existence.