GENERAL KNOWLEDGE

OXIDANTS AND ANTI-OXIDANTS

Oxidants and anti-oxidants are two types of molecules that play crucial roles in the body’s metabolic processes. Oxidants are molecules that contain oxygen and are capable of accepting electrons, while anti-oxidants are molecules that can donate electrons and neutralize oxidants.

A) Oxidants

Oxidants are molecules that contain oxygen and are capable of accepting electrons.

The primary sources of oxidants in the body include mitochondria, peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, and certain enzymes such as NADPH oxidases.

They are formed as a byproduct of normal cellular metabolism, such as the metabolism of glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids. Oxidants can also be generated by exposure to environmental stressors such as pollution, UV radiation, and smoking.

The most common oxidants in the body are:

1. Reactive oxygen species (ROS): ROS are highly reactive molecules that contain oxygen and can damage cellular components such as proteins, lipids, and DNA. Examples of ROS include superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical.

2. Nitric oxide (NO): NO is a signaling molecule that is involved in the regulation of blood flow, immune function, and neurotransmission. However, excessive levels of NO can damage cellular components and contribute to the development of diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer.

 

B) Anti-oxidants

Anti-oxidants are molecules that can donate electrons to oxidants and neutralize them. They are essential for maintaining the balance between oxidants and anti-oxidants in the body.They act by either directly scavenging ROS or by inhibiting their formation.

They also protect cells and tissues from oxidative damage by inhibiting lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and DNA damage. Additionally, antioxidants have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties and can modulate gene expression related to oxidative stress.

Anti-oxidants can be classified into two categories: exogenous and endogenous.

1. Exogenous anti-oxidants: Exogenous antioxidants are obtained through a balanced diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and seeds. These dietary sources provide a wide range of antioxidants such as carotenoids (e.g., beta-carotene), flavonoids (e.g., quercetin), and polyphenols (e.g., resveratrol).

Exogenous anti-oxidants are important for protecting the body against oxidative stress caused by environmental stressors.

Antioxidant supplements are also available, but their effectiveness in preventing oxidative stress-related diseases is still a subject of debate.

2. Endogenous anti-oxidants: These are anti-oxidants that are produced by the body. Endogenous antioxidants include enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. These enzymes work together to convert harmful oxidants into less reactive forms or eliminate them altogether.

SOD converts superoxide radicals into hydrogen peroxide, which is further broken down by catalase or glutathione peroxidase into harmless water and oxygen. Glutathione is a tripeptide antioxidant that plays a vital role in detoxification processes within cells.

Additionally, the body produces non-enzymatic antioxidants like glutathione, vitamin E, vitamin C, and coenzyme Q10.

Endogenous anti-oxidants are essential for maintaining the balance between oxidants and anti-oxidants in the body and protecting against oxidative stress caused by normal cellular metabolism.

 

C) Importance of Oxidants and Anti-oxidants

Oxidants and anti-oxidants play crucial roles in maintaining the balance between oxidation and reduction in the body. Oxidants are essential for the production of energy and the synthesis of important molecules, while anti-oxidants protect against oxidative stress and damage to cellular components.

Oxidative stress is an imbalance between oxidants and anti-oxidants that can lead to cellular damage and the development of diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, maintaining the balance between oxidants and anti-oxidants is essential for maintaining optimal health.

In conclusion, oxidants and anti-oxidants are two types of molecules that play crucial roles in maintaining the balance between oxidation and reduction in the body. Oxidants are molecules that contain oxygen and are capable of accepting electrons, while anti-oxidants are molecules that can donate electrons and neutralize oxidants. Maintaining the balance between oxidants and anti-oxidants is essential for maintaining optimal health and preventing diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative disorders.

 

Overview of Roles of Oxidants and Antioxidants

A) The main roles of oxidants include:

1. Signaling: Oxidants can act as signaling molecules, triggering various cellular responses, such as the activation of transcription factors and the regulation of gene expression.

2. Biosynthesis: Oxidants are involved in the biosynthesis of important cellular components, such as hormones and neurotransmitters.

3. Defense against pathogens: Oxidants can help protect the body against invading pathogens, such as bacteria and viruses, by damaging their cell membranes and inactivating their enzymes.

 

B) The main roles of antioxidants include:

1. Neutralizing oxidants: Antioxidants can neutralize oxidants and prevent them from damaging cellular components.

2. Protecting against oxidative stress: Antioxidants can help protect cells against oxidative stress, which can lead to cell death and tissue damage.

3. Maintaining cellular homeostasis: Antioxidants can help maintain cellular homeostasis by regulating the balance between oxidants and antioxidants.

Compitative exams mcq questions and answers previous repeated questions.