MEDICAL

THE MOST COMMON CAUSE OF POSTPARTUM HEMORRHAGE IS

  • A. Uterine atony ✓
  • B. Coagulopathy
  • C. Obstetric trauma
  • D. Retained placenta

 

The most common cause of postpartum hemorrhage is A) Uterine atony. Postpartum hemorrhage is defined as excessive bleeding following childbirth, and uterine atony refers to the inability of the uterus to contract effectively after delivery, leading to inadequate compression of blood vessels and subsequent bleeding. Uterine atony accounts for approximately 70-80% of all cases of postpartum hemorrhage and is considered a major obstetric emergency that requires prompt intervention to prevent serious complications such as hypovolemic shock and maternal mortality.

Uterine atony can be caused by various factors, including overdistension of the uterus (e.g., multiple gestation or polyhydramnios), prolonged labor, rapid labor or delivery, use of certain medications (e.g., magnesium sulfate), retained placental fragments, and maternal comorbidities such as obesity or uterine fibroids. Management of uterine atony typically involves uterine massage, administration of uterotonic medications (e.g., oxytocin or misoprostol), bimanual compression of the uterus, and in severe cases, surgical interventions such as uterine artery embolization or hysterectomy.

In other words, Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a significant cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. Uterine atony, which refers to the inability of the uterus to contract effectively after childbirth, is the most common cause of postpartum hemorrhage. When the uterus fails to contract adequately, it cannot compress the blood vessels at the site where the placenta was attached, leading to excessive bleeding.

Uterine atony can be caused by various factors, including prolonged labor, overdistension of the uterus (as seen in multiple gestations or polyhydramnios), use of certain medications during labor, rapid labor and delivery, uterine infections, or retained placental tissue.